Pregnancy effect on women can be a roller coaster ride

6 Vaccines needed for safe pregnancy and delivery

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Vaccines are essential to keep you and the community safely away from diseases and other medical conditions. It becomes even more important during pregnancy when it is not only yourself that is at risk, but also the unborn child. So, to keep you both away from such diseases, subject yourself to immunizations now.

Before:

Rubella
Rubella infection or the German measles is very dangerous to the unborn baby. It can lead to certain birth defects and can even be fatal to some. A pre-pregnancy blood test can be done to determine if you have immunity against rubella. If not, have yourself vaccinated with the vaccine preferably a month before getting pregnant, just until the blood tests show rubella antibodies.

During:

Pertussis
Pertussis or whooping cough is caused by bacteria that are transmitted through close contact with an infected person, coughing and sneezing. Some cases have even caused babies to stop breathing. The Tdap vaccine should be given during pregnancy within 27 to 36 weeks of gestation. This will protect both the mother and the child. It is also recommended that the people surrounding the mother should get vaccinated as well.

Hepatitis B
Hepa B is a serious liver disease that can lead to liver damage and cancer. It is transmitted through exposure to blood and other body fluids of an infected person. A mother with Hepatitis B will most likely pass this on to the baby during delivery.

Flu
This vaccine is important during pregnancy. A mother who harbors influenza puts her unborn child and herself at risk for premature birth and delivery. Babies may also be delivered prematurely with a low birth weight. The flu shot can be taken by pregnant mothers anytime, regardless of what trimester they are in. Other people surrounding the mother should get a flu shot as well.

Hepatitis A
The Hepatitis A vaccine helps to protect you against liver disease that is caused by food and water that is contaminated with the virus. If a pregnant mother contracts this infection, it can lead to premature labor and infections on the newborn.

After:

HPV
After pregnancy is the perfect time for you to get the vaccines you were not able to receive during pregnancy. Make sure you also get an HPV vaccine. This will protect you against the Human Papilloma virus that may cause cervical cancer in the future. It is important that you also protect yourself while you still can and before another pregnancy occurs as this vaccine cannot be given during pregnancy.

Get yourself protected before it is too late. Remember that it is not only yourself you are protecting against these deadly diseases but also your unborn child. So get immunity now while you still can.

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